The topic of tonight’s ENG 099 Conversational American English…



The topic of tonight’s ENG 099 Conversational American English MOOC Lecture was “Reading American Comic Books (1 of 2)” (video above, or click here if you cannot see the video).

Lilia was kind enough to attend! You can see the questions and character list of the comic below!

The Fantom of the Fair

Story 2

Worksheet

Characters:

  • The Fantom of the Fair (Fantom is another spelling of “Phantom”)

  • Professor Carter

  • Sir Conway

  • Ticonda

  • Sergaent Collins

  • The Driver

  • Narrator

Vocabulary

  • Fair

Comprehension Questions:

  • Page 1: Where is Ticonda from?

    • The Arctic Region

  • Page 2: Why was Professor Carter worried?

    • He knows that Ticonda can be very dangerous for other people!

  • Page 3: Why did it get so cold?

    • Ticonda broke the control panel.

  • Page 4: What did the Fantom do?

    • He came in through the ceiling and broke the door, so the people could escape.

  • Page 5: Does Ticonda know the Fantom? How do you know?

    • Ticonda knew Fantom from years ago and they had a struggle.

  • Page 6: What happens to the Driver?

    • Ticonda threw the driver out of his car, but The Fantom saved him!

  • Page 7: What do the police want to do?

    • Police want to catch Ticonda. They have the guns because Ticonda is dangerous for them!

  • Page 8: What happened to Ticonda?

    • He died, The Fantom strangled him!

Copyright Notes

  • Please respect the copyright plus terms and conditions of all links,books and media not by Charlie Danoff.
  • Video by Charlie Danoff. CCA Licensed.
  • Images from Amazing Mystery Funnies; in the Public Domain per the Digital Comics Museum research.
  • Text Copyright © 2013 by Charlie Danoff. Rights given a CC Zero 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

ENG 099 Conversational American English Atom 8: Reading American Comic Books

Atom 8: Reading American Comic Books

Comic

Please read and take notes on the comic pages 3 and 4 below:

Video

 Watch and take notes on the video from 25:00 to 39:05 (14 minutes and 5 seconds).

Exercise

  • Please answer the following questions:
    • Do you trust the Fantom?
    • Why?
    • Do you think the Fantom is a man or a woman?
    • Why?
  • Please write the answer in your blog, leave it in the comments, or use FacebookP2PU and/or Wikiversity.

Copyright Notes

  • Please respect the copyright plus terms and conditions of all links and media not by Charlie Danoff.

Revision History:

ENG 099 Conversational American English Atom 7: Language Talk (2 of 10)

Language Talk (2 of 10)

See the first part of Language Talk in Atom 3.

Language Talk Dialogue 2 of 10

Please read and take notes on the dialogue below:

Teacher.—What did you learn in the previous Lesson?

 

Pupil.— I learned that a spoken word is composed of certain sounds, and that letters are signs of sounds, and that spoken and written words are the signs of ideas.

This question should be passed from one pupil to another till all of these answers are elicited.

 

T.- All the written words in all the English books ever made, are formed of twenty-six letters, representing about forty sounds. These letters and these sounds make up what is called artificial language.

 

Of these twenty-six letters, a, e, i, o, u, and sometimes w and y, are called vowels, and the remainder are called consonants.

 

In order that you may understand what kind of sounds the vowels stand for, and what kinds the consonants represent, I will tell you something about the human voice.

Ligaments of the larynx. Posterior view. Gray952

Ligaments of the larynx. Posterior view. Gray952. Public Domain. Via the Wikimedia Commons

T.- The air breathed out from your lungs beats against two flat muscles, stretched like strings across the top of the windpipe, and causes them to vibrate. This vibrating makes sound. Take a thread, put one end between your teeth, hold the other in your fingers, draw it tight and strike it, and you will understand how voice is made.

Gray490

Gray490 from Gray’s Anatomy via Wikimedia Commons [Public Domain]

Figure 5: The Lungs pushing air up into the windpipe.

T.- If the voice thus produced comes out through the mouth held well open, a class of sounds is formed which we call vowel sounds.

But, if the voice is held back by your palate, tongue, teeth, or lips, one kind of consonant sounds is made. If the breath is driven out without voice, and is held back by these same parts of the mouth, the other kind of consonant sounds is formed. Ex. of both: b, d, g; p, t, k.

You are now prepared to understand what I mean when I say that the vowels are the letters which stand for the open sounds of the voice, and that the consonants are the letters which stand for the sounds made by the obstructed voice and the obstructed breath.

 

Vocabulary

 

DEFINITION.—Artificial Language, or Language Proper, consists of the spoken and written words used to communicate ideas and thoughts.

DEFINITION.—English Grammar is the science which teaches the forms, uses, and relations of the words of the English Language.

Video

 Watch and take notes on the video from 15:30 to 25:30 (10 minutes).

Exercise

  • Find a piece of string and practice making sounds with your voice like I did in the video; i.e.,  “Take a thread, put one end between your teeth, hold the other in your fingers, draw it tight and strike it, and you will understand how voice is made.”
    • If you can, take a picture and put it on your blog!
    • Did using the string help you better understand how voice is made? Yes or No? Why? Please write the answer in your blog, leave it in the comments, or use FacebookP2PU and/or Wikiversity.

Copyright Notes

  • Please respect the copyright plus terms and conditions of all links and media not by Charlie Danoff.
Text

Revision History:

ENG 099 Conversational American English Atom 6: Informal Telephone English

ENG 099 Conversational American English Atom 6:

Informal Telephone English

This atom is an introduction to formal telephone English that you can use for work, business, talking to a teacher or other formal conversations.

Vocabulary

Please study these vocabulary words before doing the reading and video watching below.

  • Going out – Go to a bar, club, concert or movie with friends
  • Stay in – Sit and rest at home, instead of going to a bar (opposite of going out)

Video

Please watch and take notes on the video below from 4:04 to 16:19 [12 minutes 15 seconds] to see “Informal Telephone English” explained by Mr. Danoff. The dialogue text is published below the video.
  • If you can’t see the video below, click here to watch it on YouTube.

  • A: “Not much.”
  • B: “You going out on Friday?”
  • A: “Eh, probably. Why, what’s going on?”
  • B: “There’s a party at Tony’s apartment, should be fun, you should come.”
  • A: “Time?”
  • B: “Starts around 9, I think.”
  • A: “Maybe, we’ll see. I’ve had a long week at work I might just stay in on Friday.”
  • B: “What are you, 100 years old? You will have plenty of time to rest on Saturday. So I’ll see you Friday night?”
  • A: “Yeah, OK, I will see you at Tony’s.”

Assignment

  • On your blog, in the comments below, or via FacebookP2PU and/or Wikiversity answer the following questions:
    • When would you use informal telephone English?
    • What do you prefer, going out or staying in?

Copyright Notes

Revision History:

What we did in ENG 099 Lecture 2 on Tuesday, February 26th

Tonight was the second ENG 099 Conversational American English lecture of the Feb/Mar/April 2013 sequence. It was the second of 2 orientation lectures for online students.

VIDEO

You can see a recording of the lecture below:

LECTURE NOTES

And you can read the lecture notes by clicking here.

HOMEWORK

The most important thing is to start your course blog like Alex! Watch last night’s lecture for instructions!

Read/watch the following atoms then do the exercises in your blog or via another student tool:

COPYRIGHT NOTES
  • Please respect the copyright plus terms and conditions of all links, books and media not by Charlie Danoff.
  • Unless otherwise noted, class recap text Copyright © 2013 by Charlie Danoff. Rights given a CC Zero 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

What we did in ENG 099 Lecture 1 on Monday, February 25th

Tonight was the first ENG 099 Conversational American English lecture of the Feb/Mar/April 2013 sequence. It was one of 2 orientation lectures for online students and Lilia joined me and started her new blog for the class!

You can see a recording of the lecture below:

Tomorrow night I will again be hosting an online orientation lecture for any students who were not able to join tonight!

COPYRIGHT NOTES
  • Please respect the copyright plus terms and conditions of all links, books and media not by Charlie Danoff.
  • Unless otherwise noted, class recap text Copyright © 2013 by Charlie Danoff. Rights given a CC Zero 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

ENG 099 Conversational American English (Dec. 2012) Atom 4: Christmas Short Story 1 of 10

ENG 099 Conversational American English (Dec. 2012) Atom 4:

Christmas Short Story 1 of 10

Librivox Recording of The Gift of the Magi Art Cover design by Janette  Brown. This design is in the public domain.

Students and teacher read this short story “The Gift of the Magi” by O. Henry. It is a Christmas story and given this is a December course it’s especially appropriate. O. Henry is a famous American author from the early 20th century.

O. Henry Portrait

Vocabulary

  • Please study these vocabulary words before doing the reading and video watching below.
  • magi n. pl. IPA: /meɪˈd͡ʒaɪ/ plural form of mage, or magician; “wise men or philosophers of the East” (Webster’s 1828).
  • imputation n. IPA: /ˌɪm.pjʊˈteɪ.ʃən/ a charge, saying someone did something bad; an accustion, the act of imputing or charging; attribution; ascription; also, anything imputed or charged.
  • parsimony n. IPA: /ˈpɑr səˌmoʊ ni/ not spending a lot of money; cheap; thrifty; closeness or sparingness in the expenditure of money.
  • shabby adj. IPA: /ˈʃæb.i/ old and dirty place or thing; poor; ragged.
  • flat n. IPA: /flæt/ apartment, floor, loft, or story in a building; especially, a floor of a house, which forms a complete residence in itself.

“The Gift of the Magi” 1 of 10 Text

  • Please read the text below twice and take notes.

One dollar and eighty-seven cents. That was all. And sixty cents of it was in pennies. Pennies saved one and two at a time by bulldozing the grocer and the vegetable man and the butcher until one’s cheeks burned with the silent imputation of parsimony that such close dealing implied. Three times Della counted it. One dollar and eighty-seven cents. And the next day would be Christmas.

There was clearly nothing to do but flop down on the shabby little couch and howl. So Della did it. Which instigates the moral reflection that life is made up of sobs, sniffles, and smiles, with sniffles predominating.

While the mistress of the home is gradually subsiding from the first stage to the second, take a look at the home. A furnished flat at $8 per week. It did not exactly beggar description, but it certainly had that word on the lookout for the mendicancy squad.

“The Gift of the Magi” 1 of 10 Audio

Now listen and take notes on this recording from the beginning to 1:22 to hear this lecture’s text of the short story. We will read all of it over the course of the 10 lessons.

Video

  • Please watch and take notes on the video below from 29:05 to 37:30 [4 minutes 50 seconds] to see “Language Talk 1” explained by Mr. Danoff.
  • If you can’t see the video below, click here to watch it on YouTube.

Exercise

  • In the comments below answer the following 3 questions:
    • Did you like the text, yes or no?
    • Why?
    • Why do you think Della is not happy?
  • Please leave your answer in the comments, or via FacebookP2PU and/or Wikiversity.

Copyright Notes

  • Please respect the copyright plus terms and conditions of all links and media not by Charlie Danoff.
Text
  • Atom Text Copyright © 2012 by Charlie Danoff. Rights given a CC Zero 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.
  • Christmas Short Story 1 of 10 adapted from “The Gift of the Magi,” part of O. Henry’s 1906 collection of  Short Stories “The Four Million.” Public Domain in the US, because it  was published in the US before 1923 and therefore is in the public  domain due to copyright expiration.
Video
Audio
Images
  • Librivox Recording of The Gift of the Magi Album Art Cover design by Janette  Brown. This design is in the public domain per the PDF.
  • Portrait of Porter from frontispiece in his collection of short stories, Waifs and Strays. O. Henry. “William Sydney Porter, Wiafs and Strays frontispiece” via Wikimedia Commons. By unattributed (Austin History Center, Austin Public Library). The work of art itself is in the public domain for the following reason: because its first publication occurred prior to January 1, 1923. This media file is in the public domain in the United States.

Sources

Revision History:

ENG 099 Conversational American English (Dec. 2012) Atom 3: Language Talk 1 of 10

ENG 099 Conversational American English (Dec. 2012) Atom 3:

Language Talk 1 of 10

Vocabulary

  • Please study these vocabulary words before doing the reading and video watching below.
  • bud, n. IPA: /bʌd/ a small bump on a plant stem; a future leaf or flower.Atom 3: Language Talk 1 Figure 1 - Bud Vocabulary Picture Example
  • signn. IPA: /saɪn/ that by which anything is made known or represented; that which shows evidence; a mark; a token; an indication; a proof.Atom 3: Language Talk 1 Figure 2 -  Signs Vocabulary Picture Example
    • The pictures of animals are signs of the creature names above.
  • mental, adj. IPA: /mɛntəl/ to do with the mind; intellectual.
  • idea, n. IPA: /aɪˈdiə/ a picture in your mind; a future plan: an image formed in the mind of something you may not see in front of you; a notion.Atom 3: Language Talk 1 Figure 3 - Idea Vocabulary Picture Example

Language Talk Dialogue 1 of 10

  • These “Language Talks” are designed to give you a useful way to think about English. Read the dialogue below twice and write down your answers to the teacher’s questions.
  • Teacher— I will pronounce these three sounds very slowly and distinctly, thus: b-u-d. Notice, it is the power, or sound, of the letter, and not its name, that I give. What did you hear?
  • T.— I will bold these words, so that you can see them, three letters—b-u-d. Are these letters, taken separately, signs to you of anything?
  • T.— What then do these letters, taken separately, picture to your eye?
  • Student.— They picture the sounds that came to my ear.
  • T.— Letters then are the signs of what?
  • S.— Letters are the signs of sounds.
  • T.— I will pronounce the same three sounds more rapidly, uniting them more closely: bud. These sounds, so united, form a spoken word. Of what do you think when you hear the word bud?
  • S.— I think of a little round thing that grows to be a leafy branch or a flower.
  • T.— Did you see the thing when you were thinking of it?
  • S.— No.
  • T.— Then you must have had a picture of it in your mind. We call this mental picture an idea. What called up this idea?
  • S.— It was called up by the word bud, which I heard.
  • T.— A spoken word then is the sign of what? 

Video

  • Please watch and take notes on the video below from 23:30 to 28:20 [4 minutes 50 seconds] to see “Language Talk 1” explained by Mr. Danoff.
  • If you can’t see the video below, click here to watch it on YouTube.

  • Now that you have watched the video, look back at your answers to the questions asked by the teacher in the dialogue. Think deeply about your answers again, and change them if you have a better idea.
  • After that, read the full version of this dialogue here under “Language Talk.” 

Exercise

  • In the comments below write 2 to 4 sentences explaining the differences and similarities between your original answers and those in the linked full text. What were the differences? Or, were they the same?
  • Please leave your answer in the comments, or via FacebookP2PU and/or Wikiversity.

Copyright Notes

  • Please respect the copyright plus terms and conditions of all links and media not by Charlie Danoff.
Text
Video
Audio
Images
  • Atom 3: Language Talk 1 Figure 1 – Bud Vocabulary Picture Example via PDPhoto.org. “Some flowers at Balboa Park” Copyright © 2002 by PDPhoto.org. Rights dedicated to the Public Domain under the Creative Commons Public Domain Certification.
  • Atom 3: Language Talk 1 Figure 2 –  Signs Vocabulary Picture Example via Wikimedia Commons. The work of art itself is in the public domain for the following reason: This work is in the public domain in the United States, and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less.
  • Atom 3: Language Talk 1 Figure 3 – Idea Vocabulary Picture Example via Wikimedia CommonsThe School of Athens (Raphael detail). Fresco, Stanza della Segnatura, Palazzi Pontifici, Vatican. This is a faithful photographic reproduction of an original two-dimensional work of art. The work of art itself is in the public domain for the following reason: This work is in the public domain in the United States, and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less.

Sources

Revision History:

ENG 099 Conversational American English (Dec. 2012) Atom 2: Friendly American English Greeting

ENG 099 Conversational American English (Dec. 2012) Atom 2: Friendly American English Greeting

Vocabulary

  • Yo = Hello
  • What’s up? = How are you?
  • Not much = I’m fine. = Fine, thank you.
  • You? = And you? (as a response to an earlier What’s up?)

Video

  • Please watch and take notes on the video below from 6:52 to 11:25 [4 minutes 33 seconds] to see the “Friendly American English Greeting” explained by Mr. Danoff.
  • Pay close attention when he discusses appropriate and inappropriate times to use this greeting. It is not appropriate for formal settings, e.g. work; with your teachers and/or when talking to the government.
  • If you can’t see the video below, click here to watch it on YouTube.

Slides

  • Please click through the 3 slides below in the gallery and read the captions below to go over the Friendly American English Greeting again.
  • A: “Yo.”
  • B: “Yo.”
  • A: “What’s up?”
  • B: “Not much. You?”
  • A: “Not much.”

Exercise

  • For the following 3 people, please say which greeting is appropriate: “International English” or “Friendly American English.”
    • Your Math teacher
    • Your boss at work
    • Your American college roommate
  • Please leave your answer in the comments, or via FacebookP2PU and/or Wikiversity.

Copyright Notes

Revision History:

ENG 099 Conversational American English (Dec. 2012) Atom 1: International English Greeting


ENG 099 Conversational American English (Dec. 2012) Atom 1: International English Greeting

Vocabulary

  • Hello
  • How are you?
  • I’m fine. = Fine, thank you.
  • Thank you
  • You? = And you? (as a response to an earlier How are you?)
  • Fine, too.

Video

  • Please watch and take notes on the video below from 3:00 to 6:36 [2 min. 36 seconds] to see “International English” Greeting explained by Mr. Danoff!
  • If you can’t see the video below, click here to watch it on YouTube.

Slides

  • Please consult these slides with the text below from A and B to practice the International English Greeting again.

ENG 099 Conversational American English (Dec. 2012) Atom 1: International English Greeting - Figure 1 of 3

  • A: “Hello.”
  • B: “Hello.”

ENG 099 Conversational American English (Dec. 2012) Atom 1: International English Greeting - Figure 2 of 3

  • A: “How are you?”
  • B: “Fine, thank you. You?” (Same meaning as “Fine, thank you. And you?”)

ENG 099 Conversational American English (Dec. 2012) Atom 1: International English Greeting - Figure 3 of 3

  • A: “Fine, too, thank you.”

Exercise

  • Do you like the “International English” Greeting? Why or why not?
  • Please leave your answer in the comments, or via Facebook, P2PU and/or Wikiversity.

Copyright Notes

Revision History:

ENG 099 Conversational American English MOOC (Dec. 2012) Lecture 2: Formal Telephone English

0.0 Table of Contents

  • 0.0 Table of Contents
  • 1.0 Lecture Video
  • 2.0 Formal Telephone English
    • 2.1 Vocab
    • 2.2 Recommended Video
    • 2.3 Recommended Reading
  • 3.0 Language Talk
  • 4.0 Short Story – The Gift of the Magi
  • 5.0 Assignment 1

1.0 Lecture Video

The lecture was recorded and is available below as a YouTube video.

Figure 1: ENG 099 Conversational American English Lecture 2: Formal Telephone English YouTube Lecture Recording

If you cannot see the video above, watch it on YouTube directly.

2.0 Formal Telephone English

The picture below show Alexander Grahm Bell with one of the world’s earliest telephones. He was probably using formal telephone English!

Alexander Graham Telephone in Newyork

Bell calling Chicago from New York the first time in 1892. Photo: Alexander Graham Telephone in Newyork. By Gilbert H. Grosvenor Collection, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Figure 2: Early Telephones

Formal telephone English is what you use over the phone talking to someone at work; teachers and school officials; the government and to people you respect. A good choice to start a formal phone conversation is “Hello. How are you?” while “Yo. What’s up?” is better for talking with your friends as was discussed last lesson plan.

2.1 Vocab

These 2 words come up in the lecture recording’s example formal telephone English conversation.

Quote – A guess of the price of something, often a service
Check – document that orders a payment of money from a bank account. (Via Wikipedia)

2.1 Recommended Video Resource

Please watch “Learn English 4-2 : Answering the Phone” from the FreeEnglish Video YouTube Channel twice.

2.2 Recommended Readings

Read and take notes on both About.com’s Telephone Conversations ESL handout and Englishclub.com’s Telephone tips page.
VoIP Phone

Example of a VoIP phone, commen in many American offices in 2012. Photo by Towel401 (w:File:Cisco7960G.jpeg) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Figure 3: Unlike Mr. Bell, many office telephones in 2012 use the internet instead of phone lines 

3.0 Language Talk

See the first part of Language Talk in Lecture 1.

Teacher.—What did you learn in the previous Lesson?

 

Pupil.— I learned that a spoken word is composed of certain sounds, and that letters are signs of sounds, and that spoken and written words are the signs of ideas.

This question should be passed from one pupil to another till all of these answers are elicited.

 

T.- All the written words in all the English books ever made, are formed of twenty-six letters, representing about forty sounds. These letters and these sounds make up what is called artificial language.

 

Of these twenty-six letters, a, e, i, o, u, and sometimes w and y, are called vowels, and the remainder are called consonants.

 

In order that you may understand what kind of sounds the vowels stand for, and what kinds the consonants represent, I will tell you something about the human voice.

Ligaments of the larynx. Posterior view. Gray952

Ligaments of the larynx. Posterior view. Gray952. Public Domain. Via the Wikimedia Commons

Figure 4: The Windpipe

T.- The air breathed out from your lungs beats against two flat muscles, stretched like strings across the top of the windpipe, and causes them to vibrate. This vibrating makes sound. Take a thread, put one end between your teeth, hold the other in your fingers, draw it tight and strike it, and you will understand how voice is made.

Gray490

Figure 5: The Lungs pushing air up into the windpipe.

T.- If the voice thus produced comes out through the mouth held well open, a class of sounds is formed which we call vowel sounds.

 

But, if the voice is held back by your palate, tongue, teeth, or lips, one kind of consonant sounds is made. If the breath is driven out without voice, and is held back by these same parts of the mouth, the other kind of consonant sounds is formed. Ex. of both: b, d, g; p, t, k.

 

You are now prepared to understand what I mean when I say that the vowels are the letters which stand for the open sounds of the voice, and that the consonants are the letters which stand for the sounds made by the obstructed voice and the obstructed breath.

 

DEFINITION.—Artificial Language, or Language Proper, consists of the spoken and written words used to communicate ideas and thoughts.

 

DEFINITION.—English Grammar is the science which teaches the forms, uses, and relations of the words of the English Language.

 

4.0 Short Story – The Gift of the Magi

See the first part of this story in Lecture 1.

In the vestibule below was a letter-box into which no letter would go, and an electric button from which no mortal finger could coax a ring. Also appertaining thereunto was a card bearing the name “Mr. James Dillingham Young.”

1977 US Christmas postage stamp depicting a mail box issued on October 21, 1977

1977 US Christmas postage stamp depicting a mail box issued on October 21, 1977. Uploaded by Serjmooradian at en.wikipedia [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

The “Dillingham” had been flung to the breeze during a former period of prosperity when its possessor was being paid $30 per week. Now, when the income was shrunk to $20, the letters of “Dillingham” looked blurred, as though they were thinking seriously of contracting to a modest and unassuming D. But whenever Mr. James Dillingham Young came home and reached his flat above he was called “Jim” and greatly hugged by Mrs. James Dillingham Young, already introduced to you as Della. Which is all very good.

5.0 Assignment 2

  1. Publish your notes from the Formal Telphone English Recommended Video (2.1) and Readings (2.2).
  2. Follow the example from Language Talk (3.0) “Take a thread, put one end between your teeth, hold the other in your fingers, draw it tight and strike it, and you will understand how voice is made.” put a picture of yourself holding a string from your mouth and write 2 to 3 sentences about the experience.
  3. Write a paragraph describing your apartment, try to use the same style as O. Henry (4.0) in section focus on descriptive details.

Please respect the copyright plus terms and conditions of all links and media not by Charlie Danoff. Blog post text Copyright © 2012 by Charlie Danoff. Rights given a CC Zero 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication.

Revision History:

ENG 099 Conversational American English MOOC (Dec. 2012) Lecture 1: Greetings

Recording of this lecture that aired on December 10th, 2012 at 19:00 USA CT.

0.0 Table of Contents

  • 0.0 Table of Contents
  • 1.0 Opening
  • 2.0 Topic
  • 3.0 Greetings
    • 3.1 Video
    • 3.2 International English Greeting
      • 3.2.1 Vocabulary
      • 3.2.2 Slides
    • 3.3 Friendly American English Greeting
      • 3.3.1 Vocabulary
      • 3.3.2 Slides
  • 4.0 Class Overview
  • 5.0 Language Talk
  • 6.0 Short Story
    • 6.1 Vocabulary
    • 6.2 Text
    • 6.3 Listen
  • 7.0 Next Time
  • 8.0 Assignment 1
  • 9.0 Table of Figures

1.0 Opening

Teacher and students introduce themselves to one another.

2.0 Topic

This first lecture is about American English greetings, as well as setting up the rest of the 10 week course.

3.0 Greetings

Begin by eliciting what students know about American greetings and English greetings in general.

3.1 VIDEO


Figure 1: Conversational American English: Greetings Video

If you can’t see the video above, please click here to view it on the Internet Archive (archive.org).

You can also download the Cinepack (254.1 MB), Ogg Video (17.6 MB), and/or MPEG4 (18.9 MB) files from the Internet archive.

3.2 INTERNATIONAL ENGLISH GREETING

3.2.1 Vocabulary

  • Hello
  • How are you?
  • I’m fine. = Fine, thank you.
  • Thank you
  • You? = And you? (as a response to an earlier How are you?)
  • Fine, too.

3.2.2 Slides

Figure 1: International English Slide 1 of 3
Figure 2: International English Slide 1 of 3

  • A: “Hello.”
  • B: “Hello.”

Figure 2: International English Slide 2 of 3
Figure 3: International English Slide 2 of 3

  • A: “How are you?”
  • B: “Fine, thank you. You?” (Same meaning as “Fine, thank you. And you?”)

Figure 3: International English Slide 3 of 3
Figure 4: International English Slide 3 of 3

  • A: “Fine, too, thank you.”

3.3 FRIENDLY AMERICAN ENGLISH GREETING

3.3.1 VOCABULARY

  • Yo = Hello
  • What’s up? = How are you?
  • Not much = I’m fine. = Fine, thank you.
  • You? = And you? (as a response to an earlier What’s up?)

3.3.2 SLIDES


Figure 5: Friendly American English Slide 1 of 3

  • A: “Yo.”
  • B: “Yo.”


Figure 6: Friendly American English Slide 2 of 3

  • A: “What’s up?”
  • B: “Not much. You?”


Figure 7: Friendly American English Slide 3 of 3

  • A: “Not much.”

4.0 Class Overview

Go through how the class will work and answer any questions.

  1. Choose how you want to join the course:
    1. Your own blog [read the Syllabus for instructions]: start a new one, or  (preferred)
    2. P2PU: join the official study group
    3. Wikiversity: add content to the course wiki page
    4. Facebook: Like Mr. Danoff’s Teaching Lab and post assignments
  2. Register for the course here, indicating how you’re joining and your e-mail address
  3. Join the 10 lectures (see the schedule) and/or watch the recordings
  4. Complete all 10 assignments
  5. E-mail Mr. Danoff all 10 URLs by 23:59 USA CT on December 24th the URLs to your completed, published assignments. After approval, you will receive your official ENG 099 MOOC December 2012 Badge and PDF Certificate of Completion!
Optionally, for $25 (USA) or $35 (International) you can have a print copy of your certificate mailed, plus a LinkedIn recommendation from Mr. Danoff.
After you have successfully registered, Mr. Danoff will e-mail you a username and password for this website. For each assignment, you are required to post the URL to your answers published elsewhere online.

5.0 Language Talk

We will read and discuss this conversation about the English language.

Teacher— I will pronounce these three sounds very slowly and distinctly, thus: b-u-d. Notice, it is the power, or sound, of the letter, and not its name, that I give. What did you hear?

T.— I will bold these words, so that you can see them, three letters—b-u-d. Are these letters, taken separately, signs to you of anything?

T.— What then do these letters, taken separately, picture to your eye?

Student.— They picture the sounds that came to my ear.

T.— Letters then are the signs of what?

S.— Letters are the signs of sounds.

T.— I will pronounce the same three sounds more rapidly, uniting them more closely: bud. These sounds, so united, form a spoken word. Of what do you think when you hear the word bud?

S.— I think of a little round thing that grows to be a leafy branch or a flower.

Figure 8: Language Talk Part 1

Buds Photo courtesy PDphoto.org
Figure 9: An example of buds

T.— Did you see the thing when you were thinking of it?

S.— No.

T.— Then you must have had a picture of it in your mind. We call this mental picture an idea. What called up this idea?

S.— It was called up by the word bud, which I heard.

T.— A spoken word then is the sign of what?

Figure 10: Language Talk Part 2 

6.0 Short Story

Students and teacher read this short story “The Gift of the Magi” by O. Henry. It is a Christmas story and given this is a December course it’s especially appropriate. O. Henry is a famous American author from the early 20th century.

6.1 VOCABULARY

  • Magi
  • imputation
  • parsimony
  • shabby
  • flat

6.2 TEXT

One dollar and eighty-seven cents. That was all. And sixty cents of it was in pennies. Pennies saved one and two at a time by bulldozing the grocer and the vegetable man and the butcher until one’s cheeks burned with the silent imputation of parsimony that such close dealing implied. Three times Della counted it. One dollar and eighty-seven cents. And the next day would be Christmas.

There was clearly nothing to do but flop down on the shabby little couch and howl. So Della did it. Which instigates the moral reflection that life is made up of sobs, sniffles, and smiles, with sniffles predominating.

While the mistress of the home is gradually subsiding from the first stage to the second, take a look at the home. A furnished flat at $8 per week. It did not exactly beggar description, but it certainly had that word on the lookout for the mendicancy squad.

Figure 11: “The Gift of the Magi” Part 1

6.3 LISTEN

Listen from the beginning to 1:22 to hear this lecture’s text of the short story. We will read all of it over the course of the 10 lessons.

Figure 12: “The Gift of the Magi” audio recording.

If you can’t see the audio player above, please click here to listen to it in the Wikimedia Commons (commons.wikimedia.org).

You can also download the 128Kbps MP3 (15.3 MB), Ogg Vorbis (17.6 MB), and/or 64 Kbps MP3 (7.7 MB) files from the Internet archive.

7.0 Next Time

Find out if there is anything specific the students want to learn about next lecture (tomorrow).

8.0 Assignment 1

  1.  Publish your first post introducing yourself and answering the following 5 questions:
    1. What’s your name?
    2. Where do you live?
    3. Where are you born?
    4. Why do you want to improve your English? or, What is your English studying goal?
    5. What food do you hate?
  2. Below your introduction, answer these questions:
    1. Between “International English” or “Friendly American English” which greeting do you prefer? (1 to 3 sentences)
    2. In the Language Talk section, the Teacher says “A spoken word then is the sign of what?” please answer the question in your own words. (2 to 3 sentences).
    3. Do you like the short story? Why? (2 to 3 sentences) How much does your apartment cost? More or less than $8? (2 sentences)
  3. Please write 1 question you have for 1 other participant in the MOOC
  4. Answer 2 other people’s questions in their blog comments, or via P2PU, Wikiversity or Facebook
  5. Complete the Paragogical Action Review, or PAR:
    1. Review what was supposed to happen
    2. Establish what is happening/happened
    3. Determine what’s right and wrong with what we are doing/have done
    4. What did we learn or change?
    5. What else should we change going forward?

9.0 Table of Figures

Revision History: